Godzilla - PlayStation 4

Release Date:

17 June 2015

Viewing UK:

Also on USA.
3.7

Summary:

In Godzilla on the PlayStation 4, the world has stumbled upon a revolutionary source of energy called G-Energy that is both clean and effective. All of Japan is powered by this stuff and it is served out in the form of gigantic generators. Unbeknownst to Japan, Godzilla has awoken and he is hungry for said G-Energy. So players will take control of histories favorite kaiju and they will guide his lumbering around city after city, destroying buildings and enemies all while sucking down this precious energy.

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Posted:
2015-07-23

Dave_Finnigan

Writer

PS4

3.7

Godzilla was developed by Natsume Atari Inc and released through Bandai for the PlayStation 4. This exclusive title was meant to give Godzilla fans, some of the most passionate and loyal in the world, something to cheer for. With the recent Godzilla fan having won over a new audience and the PS4 primed for a big kaiju title there was little reason to expect anything going wrong here. Natsume has a long history of making quality outside of the box titles and, well, what was there to miss? We want a game full of skyscraper monsters in HD with an enjoyable combat system, nothing less and anything more is simply a bonus. What we got was a game that tried so hard to be what we wanted but fundamental issues held it back. However, there is still some fun to be had for Godzilla fans here.

The basic premise for Godzilla is pretty simple. The world has stumbled upon a revolutionary source of energy called G-Energy (lame) that is both clean and effective. All of Japan is powered by this stuff and it is served out in the form of gigantic generators. Unbeknownst to Japan, Godzilla has awoken and he is hungry for said G-Energy. So players will take control of histories favorite kaiju and they will guide his lumbering around city after city, destroying buildings and enemies all while sucking down this precious energy. Energy is then used to improve Godzilla and make him an even tougher beast the next time around.

Before we dive too deeply into the mechanics of the game let’s talk about what should have been a fundamentally rock solid foundation: the controls. What we have here is a two thumbstick approach that gives gamers the chance to stumble around with the left thumbstick and maneuver the camera 'cinematically' with the right thumbstuck. If you want to actually turn your beast of a monster around you have to use the shoulder bumpers L1/R1 to make it happen. It’s clunky and awkward but gamers will adapt to anything. In order to fight you user your face buttons and you have a few different techniques available. You have your standard punching combo, a tail whip, and your fierce atomic breath. In order to use your atomic breath (and you will) you need to charge it up and survive while it cools down. Aiming proves to be a nightmare, however, and that is where we draw our first big strike against the video game.

So let’s say you want to attack Mothra and he is on top of a building. In order for you to hit him with your atomic breath you need to maneuver Godzilla close to him without getting too close. Next you need to line up your body, swivel the camera around, and make sure his head is lined up as well. Now you can fire your atomic breath and hope that Mothra hasn’t moved or that you didn’t slightly tilt your aim the wrong direction. It’s aggravating, frustrating, and absolutely without merit that we should have a game in 2015 that can’t get movement down.

As we’ve discussed movement we can dip deeper into combat. The core of the game, whether you are playing Versus or King of Kaiju, is based around your ability to dole out damage in a slow and methodical way. With all of your movements in the slow and lumbering variety, the pace of the fights definitely reflect the old school movies. As it turns out, the old school fights are terribly awkward and sort of boring. You can switch between your three big moves and sometimes utilize a roaring technique in order to buff yourself from an enemy attack, but there really isn’t any nuance to it. Your opponents, be they human or kaiju, will always be able to interrupt your techniques and you will very rarely get to do the same thing to them.

Let’s talk about the primary game mode, God of Destruction. In God of Destruction you are tasked with destroying G-Energy generators and you have to roll through a city in order to make it happen. There is a ticking clock for a time limit to encourage you to hurry up and you get bigger and more powerful with the more energy you consume. You’ll usually run into a big monster as well and have to fight them while trying to deal with the human army and the generators. You rack up points based on how much destruction you deal out and as you do the damage Godzilla will literally grow before your eyes. It sounds like simple destructive fun, but it is more challenging then you think. Levels are super small and the graphics are subpar to the tune of PS2 level textures. Eventually you’ll unlock other famous Godzilla monsters and you’ll be able to use them in this mode, creating some replay value as each kaiju plays differently.

If you want to upgrade Godzilla and the rest of your creatures then you will need to heavily involve yourself with the King of Kaju mode. This mode has you playing in six fast paced back to back battles. Winning these battles gives you resources to upgrade your creatures but it is a slow going affair that quickly becomes repetitious. Still, if you somehow find yourself enjoying or acclimated to the combat then you should enjoy this game mode.

Perhaps the biggest omission from the game, outside of an actual story, is local multiplayer. There is online multiplayer, with up to three total players, and the servers work quick enough. But the game is bad enough that we don’t expect there to be many people online and ready to jump into your games. However offline split screen could have gone a long way toward at least making the cheesy action palatable. Godzilla fans would probably enjoy mashing on each other if they were next to one another on a couch.

Godzilla on the PS4 is a game that should have been so much more than it is. The team missed the mark and there isn’t much to like here.

Submitted by Cheat Title Rating
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Nov 23, 2015
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Release Date:

17/06/2015

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