User Review

4 Reviews


avatar name

Posted:
2014-04-02

marriedmike

Newbie

PlayStation 3

7.5

The game comes with with great depth and there are many ways to be successful or claim victory. The screen presentations give you a lot of information about the game and although the game is about older civilizations it plays like a modern game. However as good as the game can look and play it also has its bad side. The fact that game is full of many maps can be a little bothersome as they clutter your vision and the game has little scope for improvisation as there are many rules which need to be strictly adhered to. You will also find the sound not as appealing as you may expect and it is quite often better played without the sound. One more thing that you will find disappointing is that the Wi-Fi opponents do not stay for long.

In this game you take charge of famous historical civilization and lead it from humble beginnings to world domination. You will be committing a grave mistake if you cram a strategic breadth of civilization on to a DS cartridge. You must choose which of the civilizations to command before the game starts.

There are sixteen civilizations and each has start and four era bonuses that add as you progress through the ages. The bonuses you gain will help you in your path to winning. In Civilization, there are four types of victory: Economic, cultural, technological and domination. Each of the of the victories have particular choices to be made such as which type of civilisation or race you wish to play as, the military-minded players will choose the Germans while those who are after cultural victory will appreciate the Egyptians.

When you have choose the civilization the game begins seriously and so as you set out the very first city, you will see icons surrounding the squares showing how much production, food or trade each of the cities produces. Food enlarges your population, production building units and buildings and trade furthers research. If you want to prosper in this game you must be aware of these resources. As your city enlarges and accommodates more squares you have an option letting your workers know that they should prioritize on one resource over the others. This is so because some cities and buildings will increase your resource and yield.

When the first city is up and running, it is time to start expanding your territory and you build warriors that will defend your city. The Barbarians may threaten you initially but if you defeat them you will have add gold or some bonus to your units. The villages that are there will also add bonuses or grant you new technology. If you discover the natural wonders there such as vast deserts and thick forests, you also add more bonuses. As you expand your territories you will discover that you are not alone, there are other leaders and other civilizations to either cooperate, using diplomacy, or compete with either economically or by military means. You should be careful as any advances to merge or be very friendly could lead to takeovers by those you wish to make alliances with and so become absorbed into their ambitions.

Sid Meiers, despite its drawbacks, is a great game with an interesting and often complex concept with many unforeseen twists to trap the unwary or inexperienced empire builder.

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Posted:
2010-10-12

marriedmike

Newbie

Nintendo DS

7.7

This is a tidy game so get ready to roll! As the music plays, players tap the screen, trace rhythmic patterns and keep the beat as the story unfolds on the top screen. This game is all a group of agents wearing black suits that work for an old military general. They travel all around the globe and solve peoples problems.

The next thing you may want to ask is how they would do such problem solving. Well, that is easy. They simply dance their way out until they can cure illnesses around the world. This may prove to be very mind blowing if you are not very much into dancing. However, this can be an exciting experience.

They'll rock along to 19 licensed and re-recorded songs across multiple music genres, featuring tunes such as "Material Girl," "Walkie Talkie Man," "Rock This Town" and "Jumpin' Jack Flash." Every scene is accompanied by rump-shaking tunes, but it's up to players to help keep the Elite Beat Agents grooving. The worse they do, the worse the story might end up.

Players also can try their skills in co-op or versus mode with up to three pals via local wireless. Rhythm games have come and gone, but there has never been anything like the Elite Beat Agents. Whether they're saving a tortured director from a certain flop or helping a babysitter charm a hunky quarterback, no crisis is too weird.

If you think this game is challenging, well, you are right! Some of the game's levels will likely take a lot of practice to get through if you want to perfect this game. You just need to learn the individual rhythms of each part of a specified song, and the game's margin for error is not that high. As you play this game, a meter on top of the screen will guide you if you are doing well. If you miss some steps, hits will drop you into the red quickly. The points may vary depending on the exactness of the taps that are made. However, if you make a constant practice, perfecting all the points will be no problem.

avatar name

Posted:
2013-12-28

marriedmike

Newbie

Nintendo DS

7.5

The game comes with with great depth and there are many ways to be successful or claim victory. The screen presentations give you a lot of information about the game and although the game is about older civilizations it plays like a modern game. However as good as the game can look and play it also has its bad side. The fact that game is full of many maps can be a little bothersome as they clutter your vision and the game has little scope for improvisation as there are many rules which need to be strictly adhered to. You will also find the sound not as appealing as you may expect and it is quite often better played without the sound. One more thing that you will find disappointing is that the Wi-Fi opponents do not stay for long.

In this game you take charge of famous historical civilization and lead it from humble beginnings to world domination. You will be committing a grave mistake if you cram a strategic breadth of civilization on to a DS cartridge. You must choose which of the civilizations to command before the game starts.

There are sixteen civilizations and each has start and four era bonuses that add as you progress through the ages. The bonuses you gain will help you in your path to winning. In Civilization, there are four types of victory: Economic, cultural, technological and domination. Each of the of the victories have particular choices to be made such as which type of civilisation or race you wish to play as, the military-minded players will choose the Germans while those who are after cultural victory will appreciate the Egyptians.

When you have choose the civilization the game begins seriously and so as you set out the very first city, you will see icons surrounding the squares showing how much production, food or trade each of the cities produces. Food enlarges your population, production building units and buildings and trade furthers research. If you want to prosper in this game you must be aware of these resources. As your city enlarges and accommodates more squares you have an option letting your workers know that they should prioritize on one resource over the others. This is so because some cities and buildings will increase your resource and yield.

When the first city is up and running, it is time to start expanding your territory and you build warriors that will defend your city. The Barbarians may threaten you initially but if you defeat them you will have add gold or some bonus to your units. The villages that are there will also add bonuses or grant you new technology. If you discover the natural wonders there such as vast deserts and thick forests, you also add more bonuses. As you expand your territories you will discover that you are not alone, there are other leaders and other civilizations to either cooperate, using diplomacy, or compete with either economically or by military means. You should be careful as any advances to merge or be very friendly could lead to takeovers by those you wish to make alliances with and so become absorbed into their ambitions.

Sid Meiers, despite its drawbacks, is a great game with an interesting and often complex concept with many unforseen twists to trap the unwary or inexperienced empire builder.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-04-02

marriedmike

Newbie

Xbox 360

7.5

The game comes with with great depth and there are many ways to be successful or claim victory. The screen presentations give you a lot of information about the game and although the game is about older civilizations it plays like a modern game. However as good as the game can look and play it also has its bad side. The fact that game is full of many maps can be a little bothersome as they clutter your vision and the game has little scope for improvisation as there are many rules which need to be strictly adhered to. You will also find the sound not as appealing as you may expect and it is quite often better played without the sound. One more thing that you will find disappointing is that the Wi-Fi opponents do not stay for long.

In this game you take charge of famous historical civilization and lead it from humble beginnings to world domination. You will be committing a grave mistake if you cram a strategic breadth of civilization on to a DS cartridge. You must choose which of the civilizations to command before the game starts.

There are sixteen civilizations and each has start and four era bonuses that add as you progress through the ages. The bonuses you gain will help you in your path to winning. In Civilization, there are four types of victory: Economic, cultural, technological and domination. Each of the of the victories have particular choices to be made such as which type of civilisation or race you wish to play as, the military-minded players will choose the Germans while those who are after cultural victory will appreciate the Egyptians.

When you have choose the civilization the game begins seriously and so as you set out the very first city, you will see icons surrounding the squares showing how much production, food or trade each of the cities produces. Food enlarges your population, production building units and buildings and trade furthers research. If you want to prosper in this game you must be aware of these resources. As your city enlarges and accommodates more squares you have an option letting your workers know that they should prioritize on one resource over the others. This is so because some cities and buildings will increase your resource and yield.

When the first city is up and running, it is time to start expanding your territory and you build warriors that will defend your city. The Barbarians may threaten you initially but if you defeat them you will have add gold or some bonus to your units. The villages that are there will also add bonuses or grant you new technology. If you discover the natural wonders there such as vast deserts and thick forests, you also add more bonuses. As you expand your territories you will discover that you are not alone, there are other leaders and other civilizations to either cooperate, using diplomacy, or compete with either economically or by military means. You should be careful as any advances to merge or be very friendly could lead to takeovers by those you wish to make alliances with and so become absorbed into their ambitions.

Sid Meiers, despite its drawbacks, is a great game with an interesting and often complex concept with many unforeseen twists to trap the unwary or inexperienced empire builder.