User Review

11 Reviews


  Viewing Reviews 1-10 of 11
avatar name

Posted:
2013-02-07

8877two

Super Gamer Dude

Xbox 360

9.0

Batman Arkham Asylum sees the return of Batman and this time the caped crusader has captured the Joker but, unfortunately, he has allowed him to escape. The Joker later makes his way to Arkham Asylum where he decides to come up with a concoction that allows him to make everyday baddies into super soldiers.

The game combat style is similar to other titles like Assassin Creed where you can carry out a series of moves and these moves are elevated if the right combinations of buttons are pressed at the right time. By doing this you are given the opportunity to be able to create long combo streaks and counter moves, and when very long combat punches and kicks are done in succession, super combat moves will come into play.

You also have the option during certain levels to be able to swoop down from high locations to swoop down on your enemy, and perform stealth attacks and kicking motions for closer combat. As you progress through the levels other in game gizmos become available to you, these include a Batman belt, which enables the caped crusader to be able to use grappling hooks to climb, remote sensor batarangs which can be guided for stealth killing, gels which enable Batman to move through certain walls during gameplay and many other tools are put at your disposal.

Batman Arkham Asylum also has the element of the Gothic about it which relates very much to the Batman Franchise films, books, and comics, so they have kept it in line with the overall style which is generally associated with the super hero. The characters often make an appearance more than once and as expected all the favorites are included, such as Scarecrow, Mr Freeze, the Riddler and more than 20 other characters which you will have the opportunity to meet during the game.

You also have other modes during gameplay which enable Batman to complete a series of riddles which run through the game, and you also have the option to dismiss these riddles, but may decide to revisit the game once completed, and decide to complete that series of riddles later, for extra gameplay.

The graphics within the game and the sound quality is very well presented which adds to the overall experience of the game, as far as Batman games go this is by far one of the favorites. The only downside to Batman Arkham Asylum is that the game is relatively short. The completion without doing the riddles is around ten hours and compared to other games this is a little on the short side. However, this is a very good combat action game which any Batman addict would love to own. Overall I would give this game 9 out of 10 for overall gameplay experience.

avatar name

Posted:
2013-02-26

8877two

Super Gamer Dude

Nintendo Wii

7.1

Wii Fit Plus involves many improvements compared to the previous Wii Fit. There are many newly added games, challenges and other useful features for the end user. While this game version may not be a complete different re-haul over the last game, there are many new abilities that the player is sure to notice.

Some of the key features of Wii Fit Plus include the option for the user to create their own workout routines and they may also improve their stability and posture with some of the mini-games present. One of the main differences with Wii Fit Plus is that the Wii Balance Board is used for majority of the mini-games and exercises within the game rather than utilizing mostly the Wii Remote and Wii Nunchuk. However, in Wii Fit Plus the game designers help to utilize the Wii Balance Board in innovative ways that give the gamer a chance to get a real sense of skiing, balance games and even strength and stretching exercises.

One of the most favored options for Wii Fit Plus is the fact that the person may access any of the mini-games, exercises or tests they would like without the need to unlock them beforehand. This allows people to have more fun just playing the games rather than spending time to unlock the next challenges which can be a drag at times. There are also group strength exercises that are pre-programmed into Wii Fit Plus. This enables the player to strengthen core sections of their body at a time. This may include exercises or mini-games for the upper body, mid body and lower body. While the game is pre-programmed with a variety of pre-set routines, the player may also change them to their liking. If the player does decide to create their own routines, they are able to add various different strength and Yoga exercises for a total of a 60 minute session.

An important aspect of Wii Fit Plus is the BMI calculator which helps to calculate the percentile of an individual's body mass and then displays whether or not the individual is within a normal range for their weight. This can help one to realize their BMI so that they may take steps to improve their weight if need be. If the player sets a goal, Wii Fit Plus will keep track of their weight goal and help the person to achieve it through routines. Also, game saves that include goals from Wii Fit may also be automatically transferred to Wii Fit Plus. Alongside tracking someone's goals, Wii Fit Plus will also help people to track calories and even monitor the foods they're eating if the data is input.

There are many new mini-games that have been added to the balance session of Wii Fit Plus. These games allow the person to use the balance board in conjunction with the Wii Remote and Wii Nunchuk to increase hand-eye coordination, balance and perform other tasks also. For example, some games allow the player to lift their left and right feet on the balance board as if they were running and the player may also perform a jump motion without jumping to make their character jump onto moving blocks. This allows players to feel as if they're truly within the level and are the ones jumping over obstacles.

Many aerobic games and other mini-games that allow the player to either fly or drive are also incorporated to make for a fun multiplayer experience. For example, people may play a chicken flying game in which they stand on the Wii Balance Board and flap their arms to fly through the level and reach various checkpoints. This can create for a fun family multiplayer experience that allows the whole family to play fun mini-games together. The best part about the Wii Fit Plus with Balance Board is that the game can be bought bundled together which saves financially compared to purchasing Wii Fit Plus and the Wii Balance Board separately.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-06-03

8877two

Super Gamer Dude

Wii U

6.5

When a hardcore gamer sees that a 'licensed' product, their likely reaction is to be something between revulsion and/or passive aggressive detest. These products are normally rushed, usually buggy, and with few exceptions cash-ins pushed out the door to strike while the 'iron is hot'. Thankfully, games like The Chronicles of Riddick, the recent Batman series, and even the venerable Goldeneye have proven that licensed quality can be had if games are made with the right goals in mind. Unfortunately, Beenox's fourth foray into the Spider-Man universe (among many other tie-in games), fairs about as well as one would expect amidst little change, rushed development, and a release across seven platforms that run four different generations deep.

Dating back to the well-liked Spider-Man 2, the series has been an open world staple and this iteration is no exception. Players can emulate their spidey hero and swing to their heart's content while finding missions and unearthing various collectibles along the way. This freedom delivers tangible thrills to the player but the newness doesn't have quite the same appeal, and because it hasn't really changed since the early 2000s (we're talking 2002), it can feel like an exercise in redundancy. Sure, the fidelity of the city and the animation have improved, but the sensation of flight has aged into mundanity despite its superhuman trappings.

Aside from this selling point, and it definitely is to fans, the game offers a host of collectibles and a ton of missions to pursue. In order to hit all of these side missions and goals, players are offered up a more robust combat system that attempts to borrow the look and feel of the newer Batman titles. Sadly, there's little added nuance within the increased complexity of the mechanics, and while there's a move set to expand and some experimentation to be had, players can easily dial back to a couple of simple, and early-available combos. Why press seven buttons and swivel the analog stick twice when you can mash X and accomplish the same result more efficiently?

However, a bright spot in regards to the open world traversal are the hidden collectables strewn throughout. While their placement bounces between arbitrary corners and un-ironically lazy, these items actually give players a reason to look around. Not only are devotees given expansions to their move sets, they're also afforded neat pieces of Spider-Man lore and nuggets of outright fan service. This is a certifiable bright spot amongst the familiarity of the title, and if anything, should represent a selling point to die-hard Spider-Man fans.

Aesthetically, the game is fluid and presentable but caught between generations. If you're looking for a next generation showpiece look elsewhere. Really, on any level, it doesn't do any of the systems it's on a great service (considering the stretch of development platforms should we be surprised?). Aurally, the game carries itself okay; fitting in one-liners and an acceptable score that helps to not let the buildings blend together. The best way to describe the presentation here, outside of the mediocre story replication, is serviceable. It gets the job done between moments, but it does not, in any way, add to or enrich the experience.

On the whole, The Amazing Spider-Man 2 is a forgettable experience. It's charms are few, its trappings are many, and as a fourth go-round for a developer it puts forth many of the qualities that gamers have grown to dislike about licensed products. There isn't much growth here, and it would be a difficult proposition to suggest that there is a light at the end of the tunnel if this continues. Still, collectibles are the highlight here and while some may argue that's a valid point to fans; this game is made for those looking for a Spider-Man experience, not for those looking to relive it for the umpteenth time in new fidelity. As it is, The Amazing Spider-Man 2 is not worth its full asking price (on any platform), and it will only serve those absolutely desperate for their spider-fix.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-06-03

8877two

Super Gamer Dude

3DS

9.0

'Mario Golf World Tour' for the Nintendo 3DS is a sports video game for the handheld console, this new golf title was published by Nintendo and developed by Camelot Software Planning for the 3DS only.

Tried and true, the Mario sports titles have changed very little since their N64/SNES debuts. With pick up and play controls, fast multiplayer, and a normally sharp aesthetics, each iteration (no matter how iterative) has managed to win the hearts of gamers across the generations.

'Mario Golf' is no exception, as it features a multitude of modes and courses, a great learning curve, and arguably the largest set of unlockables the series has ever seen within a golf video game. As well, it has the presentation qualities we've come to expect from Nintendo, and it beefs up in the online realm offering smart multiplayer options and a robust, RPG-like single player campaign that is best described as a cathartic blast.

Focusing first on the single player campaign, players find themselves wandering a slightly obtuse golf club, outfitting their character and cluing into whichever tournament finds them next. It's a personable and cute experience (in a Nintendo type of way), and the color and presentation go a long way in mixing against the stoicism found on the links. Notably, as characters thread and improve their players through gear and other means, and RPG-like stat improvements will be seen and felt. It's apt to say the club comes off like the town portion of your typical RPG (both in look and feel).

Luckily, the game's RPG-ish charm doesn't stop there as it extends logically to the swing-by-swing course play. Thinking of the typical JRPG's deliberative style, the golf gameplay runs at a methodical stop-start pace, enabling players to choose their club (i.e. attack or spell) and then measure their force as it connects. It's the perfect marriage of RPG and sport and while it has been for a few generations, the ideas are still as relevant as they ever were. Further, the game really encourages experimentation and exploration of golf knowledge; offering players highly demanding courses that ask the players to learn terminology, and try different approaches throughout the 54-hole campaign.

Once players complete the story-less campaign, they can continue finding additional equipment and testing their skills in various trials and simple skill improvement tasks. However, competitive players can opt to focus upon the (slightly hidden) additional courses or the varied online play. The developers have expertly crafted a few different modes that both highlight the player-developed skills while inviting replayability. From speed-play to trick shots, to regular, plain old golf, online multiplayer is a tour de force of smooth joy. 'Mario Gold World Tour' is one of Nintendo's best forays into the online gaming sector; which is a promising turn as they've more regularly adapted their franchises towards online gameplay. One aspect they can improve upon however is to find better ways to is properly incentivize the experience and better reward the more dedicated, and perhaps skilled players. In short; they've got the net code, they've got the gameplay, now they need the lasting appeal.

Rounding out the package is the presentation, which stands out well here with a vibrant color palette and the typical Mario aesthetic exuding its charms. The 3D lends itself very well to the game of golf and the atmosphere and occasional music mix a feeling of 'proper' and a certain sense of the nostalgia seemingly inherent within the Mario universe. On the whole, aside from some strange menu challenges (finding the extra courses), and an occasionally fidgety camera, the game is a handheld dream.

On the whole, 'Mario Golf World Tour' for the Nintendo 3DS is a content rich title with tight gameplay and a vibrant presentation. While we've played many iterations of this series, it remains as solid as ever, and it adds just enough zest while retaining its calming roots to be worth a look. As well, the mix of online multiplayer and the allure of on-the-go golfing is a hard combo to pass up.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-06-03

Nothing much new but lots to do.

8877two

Super Gamer Dude

PC Games

6.5

When a hardcore gamer sees that a 'licensed' product, their likely reaction is to be something between revulsion and/or passive aggressive detest. These products are normally rushed, usually buggy, and with few exceptions cash-ins pushed out the door to strike while the 'iron is hot'. Thankfully, games like The Chronicles of Riddick, the recent Batman series, and even the venerable Goldeneye have proven that licensed quality can be had if games are made with the right goals in mind. Unfortunately, Beenox's fourth foray into the Spider-Man universe (among many other tie-in games), fairs about as well as one would expect amidst little change, rushed development, and a release across seven platforms that run four different generations deep.

Dating back to the well-liked Spider-Man 2, the series has been an open world staple and this iteration is no exception. Players can emulate their spidey hero and swing to their heart's content while finding missions and unearthing various collectibles along the way. This freedom delivers tangible thrills to the player but the newness doesn't have quite the same appeal, and because it hasn't really changed since the early 2000s (we're talking 2002), it can feel like an exercise in redundancy. Sure, the fidelity of the city and the animation have improved, but the sensation of flight has aged into mundanity despite its superhuman trappings.

Aside from this selling point, and it definitely is to fans, the game offers a host of collectibles and a ton of missions to pursue. In order to hit all of these side missions and goals, players are offered up a more robust combat system that attempts to borrow the look and feel of the newer Batman titles. Sadly, there's little added nuance within the increased complexity of the mechanics, and while there's a move set to expand and some experimentation to be had, players can easily dial back to a couple of simple, and early-available combos. Why press seven buttons and swivel the analog stick twice when you can mash X and accomplish the same result more efficiently?

However, a bright spot in regards to the open world traversal are the hidden collectables strewn throughout. While their placement bounces between arbitrary corners and un-ironically lazy, these items actually give players a reason to look around. Not only are devotees given expansions to their move sets, they're also afforded neat pieces of Spider-Man lore and nuggets of outright fan service. This is a certifiable bright spot amongst the familiarity of the title, and if anything, should represent a selling point to die-hard Spider-Man fans.

Aesthetically, the game is fluid and presentable but caught between generations. If you're looking for a next generation showpiece look elsewhere. Really, on any level, it doesn't do any of the systems it's on a great service (considering the stretch of development platforms should we be surprised?). Aurally, the game carries itself okay; fitting in one-liners and an acceptable score that helps to not let the buildings blend together. The best way to describe the presentation here, outside of the mediocre story replication, is serviceable. It gets the job done between moments, but it does not, in any way, add to or enrich the experience.

On the whole, The Amazing Spider-Man 2 is a forgettable experience. It's charms are few, its trappings are many, and as a fourth go-round for a developer it puts forth many of the qualities that gamers have grown to dislike about licensed products. There isn't much growth here, and it would be a difficult proposition to suggest that there is a light at the end of the tunnel if this continues. Still, collectibles are the highlight here and while some may argue that's a valid point to fans; this game is made for those looking for a Spider-Man experience, not for those looking to relive it for the umpteenth time in new fidelity. As it is, The Amazing Spider-Man 2 is not worth its full asking price (on any platform), and it will only serve those absolutely desperate for their spider-fix.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-06-03

8877two

Super Gamer Dude

Xbox 360

6.5

When a hardcore gamer sees that a 'licensed' product, their likely reaction is to be something between revulsion and/or passive aggressive detest. These products are normally rushed, usually buggy, and with few exceptions cash-ins pushed out the door to strike while the 'iron is hot'. Thankfully, games like The Chronicles of Riddick, the recent Batman series, and even the venerable Goldeneye have proven that licensed quality can be had if games are made with the right goals in mind. Unfortunately, Beenox's fourth foray into the Spider-Man universe (among many other tie-in games), fairs about as well as one would expect amidst little change, rushed development, and a release across seven platforms that run four different generations deep.

Dating back to the well-liked Spider-Man 2, the series has been an open world staple and this iteration is no exception. Players can emulate their spidey hero and swing to their heart's content while finding missions and unearthing various collectibles along the way. This freedom delivers tangible thrills to the player but the newness doesn't have quite the same appeal, and because it hasn't really changed since the early 2000s (we're talking 2002), it can feel like an exercise in redundancy. Sure, the fidelity of the city and the animation have improved, but the sensation of flight has aged into mundanity despite its superhuman trappings.

Aside from this selling point, and it definitely is to fans, the game offers a host of collectibles and a ton of missions to pursue. In order to hit all of these side missions and goals, players are offered up a more robust combat system that attempts to borrow the look and feel of the newer Batman titles. Sadly, there's little added nuance within the increased complexity of the mechanics, and while there's a move set to expand and some experimentation to be had, players can easily dial back to a couple of simple, and early-available combos. Why press seven buttons and swivel the analog stick twice when you can mash X and accomplish the same result more efficiently?

However, a bright spot in regards to the open world traversal are the hidden collectables strewn throughout. While their placement bounces between arbitrary corners and un-ironically lazy, these items actually give players a reason to look around. Not only are devotees given expansions to their move sets, they're also afforded neat pieces of Spider-Man lore and nuggets of outright fan service. This is a certifiable bright spot amongst the familiarity of the title, and if anything, should represent a selling point to die-hard Spider-Man fans.

Aesthetically, the game is fluid and presentable but caught between generations. If you're looking for a next generation showpiece look elsewhere. Really, on any level, it doesn't do any of the systems it's on a great service (considering the stretch of development platforms should we be surprised?). Aurally, the game carries itself okay; fitting in one-liners and an acceptable score that helps to not let the buildings blend together. The best way to describe the presentation here, outside of the mediocre story replication, is serviceable. It gets the job done between moments, but it does not, in any way, add to or enrich the experience.

On the whole, The Amazing Spider-Man 2 is a forgettable experience. It's charms are few, its trappings are many, and as a fourth go-round for a developer it puts forth many of the qualities that gamers have grown to dislike about licensed products. There isn't much growth here, and it would be a difficult proposition to suggest that there is a light at the end of the tunnel if this continues. Still, collectibles are the highlight here and while some may argue that's a valid point to fans; this game is made for those looking for a Spider-Man experience, not for those looking to relive it for the umpteenth time in new fidelity. As it is, The Amazing Spider-Man 2 is not worth its full asking price (on any platform), and it will only serve those absolutely desperate for their spider-fix.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-06-03

8877two

Super Gamer Dude

PlayStation 3

6.5

When a hardcore gamer sees that a 'licensed' product, their likely reaction is to be something between revulsion and/or passive aggressive detest. These products are normally rushed, usually buggy, and with few exceptions cash-ins pushed out the door to strike while the 'iron is hot'. Thankfully, games like The Chronicles of Riddick, the recent Batman series, and even the venerable Goldeneye have proven that licensed quality can be had if games are made with the right goals in mind. Unfortunately, Beenox's fourth foray into the Spider-Man universe (among many other tie-in games), fairs about as well as one would expect amidst little change, rushed development, and a release across seven platforms that run four different generations deep.

Dating back to the well-liked Spider-Man 2, the series has been an open world staple and this iteration is no exception. Players can emulate their spidey hero and swing to their heart's content while finding missions and unearthing various collectibles along the way. This freedom delivers tangible thrills to the player but the newness doesn't have quite the same appeal, and because it hasn't really changed since the early 2000s (we're talking 2002), it can feel like an exercise in redundancy. Sure, the fidelity of the city and the animation have improved, but the sensation of flight has aged into mundanity despite its superhuman trappings.

Aside from this selling point, and it definitely is to fans, the game offers a host of collectibles and a ton of missions to pursue. In order to hit all of these side missions and goals, players are offered up a more robust combat system that attempts to borrow the look and feel of the newer Batman titles. Sadly, there's little added nuance within the increased complexity of the mechanics, and while there's a move set to expand and some experimentation to be had, players can easily dial back to a couple of simple, and early-available combos. Why press seven buttons and swivel the analog stick twice when you can mash X and accomplish the same result more efficiently?

However, a bright spot in regards to the open world traversal are the hidden collectables strewn throughout. While their placement bounces between arbitrary corners and un-ironically lazy, these items actually give players a reason to look around. Not only are devotees given expansions to their move sets, they're also afforded neat pieces of Spider-Man lore and nuggets of outright fan service. This is a certifiable bright spot amongst the familiarity of the title, and if anything, should represent a selling point to die-hard Spider-Man fans.

Aesthetically, the game is fluid and presentable but caught between generations. If you're looking for a next generation showpiece look elsewhere. Really, on any level, it doesn't do any of the systems it's on a great service (considering the stretch of development platforms should we be surprised?). Aurally, the game carries itself okay; fitting in one-liners and an acceptable score that helps to not let the buildings blend together. The best way to describe the presentation here, outside of the mediocre story replication, is serviceable. It gets the job done between moments, but it does not, in any way, add to or enrich the experience.

On the whole, The Amazing Spider-Man 2 is a forgettable experience. It's charms are few, its trappings are many, and as a fourth go-round for a developer it puts forth many of the qualities that gamers have grown to dislike about licensed products. There isn't much growth here, and it would be a difficult proposition to suggest that there is a light at the end of the tunnel if this continues. Still, collectibles are the highlight here and while some may argue that's a valid point to fans; this game is made for those looking for a Spider-Man experience, not for those looking to relive it for the umpteenth time in new fidelity. As it is, The Amazing Spider-Man 2 is not worth its full asking price (on any platform), and it will only serve those absolutely desperate for their spider-fix.

avatar name

Posted:
2012-10-22

8877two

Super Gamer Dude

Xbox 360

5.0

The story for Tenchu Z has to do with a certain evil man who is trying to traffic an illegal drug, and also take over your town. This story is told by cutscenes that you watch before and after every mission. The game has 50 of them, and despite it seeming like there would be a lot of story to be had there, it’s actually really lacking. The cutscenes tell some of the story, and miss parts that would be important, leaving you as a ninja wondering just why it is that you’re doing this.

As you start playing through those fifty missions, another question that you begin to wonder is, Haven't I done this before? That’s because those fifty missions are all very similar, with you needing to seek out a single person inside of a village, or town, that you start outside. Sometimes you have to kill multiple people in a level, or follow someone undetected, but generally it’s just to talk to, or kill, or rescue some person in a village. Generally, these missions all want you to stay hidden as you traverse the level, too, which leads to the biggest problem in the game.

That is that there is really no problem for players to completely break the game’s rules, and do what they want. The task of a ninja is generally to stay hidden by hiding in bushes, shadows, around corners, or other places. There are meters in the game to actually show these things, like how well you’re hidden, how alert the enemy is, and how near you are to the closest enemy. The game doesn’t reward a player at all for staying hidden, though, since guards will come looking for you, but almost immediately return to their posts, only to be standing there waiting to die when you come-a-calling. It’s absurd, and doesn't make a person want to hide in the dark, waiting to assassinate a target when they can just run (or somersault) over to the person when their back is turned and kill them with the push of a button.

While there might be some enjoyment to be had from trying to play the game as the designers intended, the inconsistencies of hiding in the dark and still being seen, as well as trying to control the camera in cramped quarters will make you soon abandon your effort in the name of ninja sanity.

Tenchu Z tries hard, like many other ninja games, to provide an experience that is as close to being a true ninja as can be had. This game, however, fails in that effort, since it doesn’t take ninja skill in the slightest to beat it.

avatar name

Posted:
2013-01-27

8877two

Super Gamer Dude

PC Games

6.0

Asassins Creed 3, transports the assassin and his hunting skills to the time to the American revolution in the search for remnants of the Ancient Order of Templars. Featuring a host of new characters and a new assassin, the game covers several decades of action with more use of firearms contemporary with the depicted era as well as American Indian traditional weapons such bows and tomahawks.

The year is 1775 and we have a new young part Indian warrior, more properly an Indian brave, but this word may cause some confusion if we describe him as a brave Indian brave, the product of an native Indian mother and a white British father. His initial purpose is to fight the white invader who is ruthlessly taking over his homeland and repressing his people. But circumstances change his role to that of assassin as the adventure unfolds.

The action takes place over many years and sees Connor, our hero, travel through desert, mountain, vast fertile plains through all weathers. He passes through unfamiliar city streets and across the scenes of violent and bloody battlefields in his quest. In an unexpected twist to the story some of the action takes place on a naval vessel

This is the fifth title in the assassin series and introduces new skills to the assassins armory adding the innate tracking and weapons skills of the native American, a trained hunter from a young age. Skills such as hunting trapping animals and using their hides which you have the opportunity of putting into practice. Although most of the content is new, links with previous titles are nevertheless present.

Many of the real historical sites are visited such as Lexington and Bunker Hill, and American military and political leaders of the time which are now household names like Washington and Franklin and Thomas Jefferson are introduced. Cities such as Boston and New York, the British ruler of the time, George III also feature.

The game sticks to the basic original assassin concept and introduces much that is new and interesting but it does not capture in essence the much better portrayed and, dare I say it, believable or at least more atmospheric setting, of the European adventures. Some of the places visited in the latest game, and some of the tasks seem much too removed from the actual story. It may not be a good idea to mix up extreme fantasy with fairly recent real historical events. Definitely not the best in the series so far, the novelty soon wears off.

So we have a game sticking to a well tried and tested concept but perhaps trying too hard to introduce stuff for the sake of being different. Not a good mix and not a highly recommended game. In my opinion worth looking at but do not expect it to outshine all of the previous titles in the series.

avatar name

Posted:
2014-06-03

8877two

Super Gamer Dude

Xbox One

6.5

When a hardcore gamer sees that a 'licensed' product, their likely reaction is to be something between revulsion and/or passive aggressive detest. These products are normally rushed, usually buggy, and with few exceptions cash-ins pushed out the door to strike while the 'iron is hot'. Thankfully, games like The Chronicles of Riddick, the recent Batman series, and even the venerable Goldeneye have proven that licensed quality can be had if games are made with the right goals in mind. Unfortunately, Beenox's fourth foray into the Spider-Man universe (among many other tie-in games), fairs about as well as one would expect amidst little change, rushed development, and a release across seven platforms that run four different generations deep.

Dating back to the well-liked Spider-Man 2, the series has been an open world staple and this iteration is no exception. Players can emulate their spidey hero and swing to their heart's content while finding missions and unearthing various collectibles along the way. This freedom delivers tangible thrills to the player but the newness doesn't have quite the same appeal, and because it hasn't really changed since the early 2000s (we're talking 2002), it can feel like an exercise in redundancy. Sure, the fidelity of the city and the animation have improved, but the sensation of flight has aged into mundanity despite its superhuman trappings.

Aside from this selling point, and it definitely is to fans, the game offers a host of collectibles and a ton of missions to pursue. In order to hit all of these side missions and goals, players are offered up a more robust combat system that attempts to borrow the look and feel of the newer Batman titles. Sadly, there's little added nuance within the increased complexity of the mechanics, and while there's a move set to expand and some experimentation to be had, players can easily dial back to a couple of simple, and early-available combos. Why press seven buttons and swivel the analog stick twice when you can mash X and accomplish the same result more efficiently?

However, a bright spot in regards to the open world traversal are the hidden collectables strewn throughout. While their placement bounces between arbitrary corners and un-ironically lazy, these items actually give players a reason to look around. Not only are devotees given expansions to their move sets, they're also afforded neat pieces of Spider-Man lore and nuggets of outright fan service. This is a certifiable bright spot amongst the familiarity of the title, and if anything, should represent a selling point to die-hard Spider-Man fans.

Aesthetically, the game is fluid and presentable but caught between generations. If you're looking for a next generation showpiece look elsewhere. Really, on any level, it doesn't do any of the systems it's on a great service (considering the stretch of development platforms should we be surprised?). Aurally, the game carries itself okay; fitting in one-liners and an acceptable score that helps to not let the buildings blend together. The best way to describe the presentation here, outside of the mediocre story replication, is serviceable. It gets the job done between moments, but it does not, in any way, add to or enrich the experience.

On the whole, The Amazing Spider-Man 2 is a forgettable experience. It's charms are few, its trappings are many, and as a fourth go-round for a developer it puts forth many of the qualities that gamers have grown to dislike about licensed products. There isn't much growth here, and it would be a difficult proposition to suggest that there is a light at the end of the tunnel if this continues. Still, collectibles are the highlight here and while some may argue that's a valid point to fans; this game is made for those looking for a Spider-Man experience, not for those looking to relive it for the umpteenth time in new fidelity. As it is, The Amazing Spider-Man 2 is not worth its full asking price (on any platform), and it will only serve those absolutely desperate for their spider-fix.


  Viewing Reviews 1-10 of 11